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WCAG 2.2 – 2.5.7 Dragging Movements (Level AA) – A Summary

Published: February 6, 2024

The aim of this Success Criterion is to eliminate the need for precise dexterity when dragging dynamic elements on a web page. The reality is that not all users can accurately press, hold, and reposition a pointer simultaneously.

Those individuals who find such precise pointer movements problematic should get the same result as their dexterous colleagues, using just a single pointer. Individuals helped by this success criteria include website visitors using input devices like trackballs, head pointers, eye-gaze systems, or speech-controlled mouse emulators.

The WCAG 2.2 2.5.7 Success Criteria states:

This criterion excludes scrolling enabled by the user-agent (i.e., browser, screen reader, media players, mobile devices, and assistive technologies), and techniques like CSS overflow to create scrollable content sections. The CSS overflow property creates a scrollable content section with a webpage.

Alternatives for Dragging Movements on the Same Page

If an equivalent option allows single-pointer access without dragging, this Success Criterion is met. It doesn’t have to be the same component, as long as the functionality is equivalent. For instance, a colour wheel with a dragging indicator can be complemented by text fields for numerical input.

What is not included

The checkpoint does not include any scrollbars on the browser itself or draggle functionality that is native to the browser interface. It only applies to draggle content created by the website author.

Accessibility auditing and consultancy

I provide comprehensive digital content accessibility consultancy services, including an accessibility auditing of your websites and documents – measured against the WCAG 2.2 standard. Get in touch to ensure your content is accessible to your widest possible audience and meets equality legislation requirements.

Don’t rely on automated tools for checking web accessibility

Published: August 8, 2014

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in the article, ‘Evaluating Web Sites for Accessibility’, states,

“No single evaluation tool yet provides comprehensive information or captures all problems with regard to the accessibility of a site; therefore evaluation involves a combination of approaches.” http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/

Of course this is not new, as far back as 2004 The Disability Rights Commission highlighted issues related to testing website using the W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines,

“It is very significant that the majority of those Checkpoints that this investigation found to be the most important are qualitative, in the sense that they require the exercise of human judgement. Automatic testing tools alone cannot, therefore, verify effective compliance.” http://www.drc-gb.org/publicationsandreports/2.pdf

Evaluating website accessibility is an art not a science – it can’t be reduced to running your site through Bobby and keeping your fingers crossed that everything will be ok.

Even today automated tools still can’t be relied upon to check the accessibility of websites; you will always need a human being with some knowledge of the subject to do that.

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Alternative access to client feedback

“The audit was extremely comprehensive, clear and demonstrated Jim’s expertise in the area of accessible web design.” Peter Madden, Project Manager, Sealed Envelope Ltd